Talks

Have an overview over planned talks so far. Tracks and dates are not yet decided, so keep an eye the page.

To make it esay for you to keep up with new abstracts, you will find the newest abstracts on top of the list.

Green, cost-saving and safe IT

Speaker: 
Jan Viegand

Do you want to be really green and at the same time reduce the energy bill for IT equipment? Jan Viegand from Danish Energy Saving Trust (Go' Energi) will give inspiration and good advices on how you can purchase and run IT equipment more efficiently - from the client computer to the large datacentres. The presentation is both for environmental- and cost-oriented IT managers and CIOs.

Mastering lists and function logic with Python

Speaker: 
Thomas Ammitzbøll-Bach

Python has some very capable functions and language features to support manipulations of lists and other iterables and working with function types. This talk explores some of these including list comprehensions, generator functions, lambda functions, higher order functions and variable closures. By many people these techniques are considered black magic, but the aim of this talk is to remove the ""black"" part of the magic and make it a usable pattern in working with lists.

If you are looking for a way to advance your skills in Python programming, this is the talk for you.

Copenhagen Suborbitals

Speaker: 
Copenhagen Suborbitals

Copenhagen Suborbitals has been in the worldwide media, since its successful rocket launch in June 2011 – the world’s first amateur rocket has broken past the speed of sound and a step towards venturing into space has now become reality.

With backgrounds as submarine-builders, architects specializing in aerospace travel and including former employment at NASA, the duo behind the name is amidst constructing the world’s first privately owned rocket for human spaceflight.

Maximizing the value of open source software for smaller companies

Speaker: 
Mattias Backman

In the first decade of the twenty first century we saw open source software (OSS) move from an area of curiosity, niche applications and questionable deployment, to mainstream adoption by a wide spectrum of organizations. Increased velocity and lower cost of development, coupled with breadth of applications and peer-reviewed quality of OSS has overcome the questions around obligations associated with their licenses and copyrights.

Titanium Mobile – A brief overview and introduction to a cross platform framework

Speaker: 
Jörgen Buder

Titanium offers what most other frameworks don´t. A simple language that almost anybody knows or can learn quickly, a cross compilation to native code that keeps performance to a maximum and a cross platform strategy that makes best of breed apps, without ever being noticed. Titanium Mobile makes it easy to be productive and have a vast library of features and UI objects that can create any type of mobile application. Titanium also offers extendibility and open source licenses so that we all can adapt what we want.

Titanium Mobile – Cross platform framework, a business advantage

Speaker: 
Jörgen Buder

From a Titanium Mobile course at Malmö Yrkeshögskola to an Appcelerator Authorized Training Partner and a mobile development initiative. Purple Scout AB started to develop the mobile business case almost two years ago and focus on ROI as well as smart apps for smartphones. This talk is about the frustration of having to choose one platform or the other and limit your business possibilities and how Purple Scout produce a new breed of app developers that can use both iOS and Android.

C++11

Speaker: 
Bryan Østergaard

C++11 was approved roughly 6 months ago and brings about many major as
well as minor new features.

Many of the new features allows new and better ways to express
algorithms in C++ or enhance performance greatly. Bryan will focus on
how some of the new features are going to change the way libraries and
programs are written when using the C++11 standard.

Cooperative Multitasking Revisited in Lua

Speaker: 
Emil Renner Berthing

This talk will present the speakers motivation for writing the Lua
Event Machine -- an efficient engine for writing concurrent
applications in Lua using cooperative multitasking.
Many applications are not simple functions from input to output, but
long lived processes which has to handle and respond to input from
many different sources simultaneously.
Traditional approaches to writing such programs are either
multithreaded- or event oriented programs. However, both of these

Homeport: "The software that everybody needs, but no one will pay to develop."

Speaker: 
Jesper B. Rosenkilde

Homeport is a piece of middleware for writing RESTful web services in
C, for embedded devices running Linux. The types of services offered
from Homeport are specifically minded towards seeing home automation,
energy optimisation in the home etc. as an "Internet of Things".
Specifically devices (light dimmers, power meter, etc.) are seen as a
collection of services to be read and/or modified.

CensurFriDNS

Speaker: 
Thomas Steen Rasmussen

A proper modern nameserver should be uncensored, it should have DNSSEC support, IPv6 support, and it should be secure and free for everyone to use. The ISP nameservers typically have none of these properties. www.censurfridns.dk was founded in 2009 due to a lack of proper nameservers. This talk will briefly introduce the service, and the rationale behind starting it. I will also be touching on some of the technical issues you face when running an open recursive resolver on todays internet, such as DoS attack handling.

Mercurial

Speaker: 
Sune Foldager

This talk will be about distributed version control in general, and Mercurial, on of the oldest open source DVCS, in particular. I’ll be focusing on the basic principles and workflows as well as the more advanced commands and workflows enabled through the use of extensions.

Finally, I’ll talk about my experience with implementing Mercurial at my work place, a danish software company with around 160 developers, and how we transitioned from CVS.

The IPTV-analyzer

Speaker: 
Jesper Dangaard Brouer

This talk is about the IPTV-analyzer project and how it all started out. The project is an open source IPTV/MPEG2-TS analyzer, that perform continous realtime monitoring.

The project started because commercial IPTV/MPEG2-TS analyzer equipment is too expensive.

Android vs. iPhone & Windows Phone

Speaker: 
Brian Eberhardt

Development & System Management

An overview of the status of technologies and tools for developing and managing the mobile platforms Android, iOS and Windows Phone. How is the quality of tools and services compared to traditional operating system platforms?

Development: The programming languages and the development environments, pros and cons.

Distribution: How to distribute apps in application stores? How to distribute apps internally in the enterprise.

Strategies of openness: How 'open' can change society - if we let it.

Speaker: 
Henrik Chulu and Christian Villum

From software and data to content and policy, openness is changing very basic societal ways to organize, structure, share, do business and make a living. In this talk we look at the various ways the concept of open is currently being employed across fields in society and how it's making fundamental change, as well as how certain entities in society feel threatened by such development. We will of course get into ACTA, SOPA and the copyright industry, but also look at generation gaps and the contemporary ideological conflicts.

Hindsight: A Prototype for a Flexible, Secure and Crash-safe Backup System

Speaker: 
Johan Brinch & Morten Brøns-Pedersen

Hindsight is a backup system providing guaranteed safe backup to untrusted sources such as Amazon S3 or DropBox. In this talk we discuss the problems we encountered as well as our solutions - how we handle system crashes, reference counting, a simple module system for external storage and storage of data produced by the backup system itself.

Keynote

Speaker: 
Superusers

New Technology and The Human Factor

Speaker: 
Anne Østergaard

Lawrence Lessig said: ""Code is Law"". He also pointed out the risks and dangers that follows from this fact.- Code, or architecture, sets the terms on which life in cyberspace is experienced. Who has access and so on...

- Some faults are due to technology, others are the result of lack of information, and many are still related to human errors and other human factors.

In this presentation it is my intention to share with you examples of all sorts of legal, technical and human "bugs" or misunderstandings that I and my friends have come across.

FreeBSD jail management with ezjail

Speaker: 
Thomas Rasmussen

The FreeBSD jail mechanism is an implementation of operating system-level virtualization that provides a resource effective way of separating services for security and management purposes.

FreeBSD jails have been around since the days of FreeBSD 4.0, but a lot has happened since then. Among the newer features is hierarchical jails, better management tools, CPU & memory resource management, multi-ip/ipv6-only/ip-less jails and ZFS based goodness.

Mastering lists and function logic with Python

Speaker: 
Thomas Ammitzbøll-Bach

Python has some very capable functions and language features to support manipulations of lists and other iterables and working with function types. This talk explores some of these including list comprehensions, generator functions, lambda functions, higher order functions and variable closures. By many people these techniques are considered black magic, but the aim of this talk is to remove the "black" part of the magic and make it a usable pattern in working with lists.

If you are looking for a way to advance your skills in Python programming, this is the talk for you.

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